KDLT tower

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KDLT Tower
KDLT Tower.jpg
General information
TypeTelevision Tower
AddressCounty Highway 111
Town or cityRowena, South Dakota
CountryUnited States
Coordinates43°30′18″N 96°33′23″W / 43.50500°N 96.55639°W / 43.50500; -96.55639
Elevation434.9 meters (1,427 ft)
CompletedAugust 19, 1998
OwnerGray Media Group, Inc.
Height609.2 meters (1,999 ft)
KDLT tower rigging

The KDLT towers are two towers used by KDLT, they are both high guy-wired aerial masts for the transmission of TV programs in Rowena, South Dakota. The original analog tower built in 1976 is 477 meters (1,565 ft)[1] while the newer digital tower built in 1998 is 609.2 meters (1,999 ft).[2] They are owned by Gray Media Group, Inc.[2] The digital tower is one of the tallest structures in the world.

History[edit]

The analog tower is no longer active, KDLT now uses the digital, but the beacon lights at the top of both towers must be replaced when they malfunction as a warning for aircraft.[3][4] Replacement of the beacon bulb at the top of the digital tower was featured in an episode of World's Toughest Fixes during Season 1 in 2010.[5] In 2015, amateur drone video footage of a man changing the light bulb on the analog tower went viral attracting more than 17 million hits on YouTube and garnering attention from CNN and a newspaper in Britain.[6][7][8] On learning of the drone footage, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ordered no more flights as drones are by law restricted to a ceiling of 400 feet (120 m), the tower being about five times that height.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Listing 1042111". Antenna Structure Registration database. U.S. Federal Communications Commission.
  2. ^ a b "Listing 1042104". Antenna Structure Registration database. U.S. Federal Communications Commission.
  3. ^ Cooper, Kindra (16 February 2015). "The view from this South Dakota TV Tower is as grand & dizzying as any Manhattan skyscraper". The Architect's Newspaper. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  4. ^ Moran, Lee (5 January 2015). "SEE IT: South Dakota repairman changes light bulb … on 1,500-foot TV antenna". New York Daily News. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  5. ^ Cruit, Nick (November 25, 2008). "Local man repairs 2,000-foot tower on TV". Sierra Sun. Retrieved September 28, 2021.
  6. ^ Hult, John (January 8, 2015). "Sky-high climb in Salem passes 1 million views". Argus Leader. Retrieved September 28, 2021 – via USA Today.
  7. ^ Fast, Austin (April 27, 2017). "WATCH: Death-defying drone footage shows man changing lightbulb atop 1,500-foot TV tower". WCPO-TV. Retrieved September 28, 2021.
  8. ^ Kludt, Tom (January 6, 2015). "Spectacular drone footage brings tower repairman his viral moment". CNN. Retrieved September 28, 2021.
  9. ^ Kevin Eck (January 3, 2015). "The FAA Was Not a Fan of the TV Tower Drone Video". Ad Week. Retrieved September 28, 2021.

External links[edit]